Published
November 7, 2019

Gardens: Freedom from Hunger

Robert Lubega

Uganda is known as the “Pearl of Africa!” The beauty in the land and its people shine everywhere you look. But many rural residents seem not to be able to crack open the shell to find the pearl.

One of the most significant barriers is their attitude. They don’t have hope and lack motivation.

“Before you came, the little money my husband could make as a cobbler wasn’t enough to feed the family and pay for school fees for our eight children.  I feared digging (farming) since I thought it was a curse,”  said Fatuma (center below).

Your gifts help to change the minds and hearts of people trained by FARM STEW.

Robert, (in green), spent time with David, and his wife Fatuma recently during one of many FARM STEW home visits in Wagona Village, Eastern Uganda. He was really impressed with their new thriving garden.  David, Fatuma, and many other families demonstrated the results of techniques they learned from FARM STEW.  Here' what Fatuma had to share: 

“After FARM STEW taught us the benefit of gardens and provided us with vegetable seeds, it made my turning point.  Now I'm seeing myself as a very useful person in my community. By growing vegetables, we can afford to prepare them to eat, and we are healthier.
Some of the people in the community now come to buy vegetables. I now have vegetables at all stages of growth; still in the nursery bed, growing ones and those that are ready to harvest. By selling the extra, I can now send my kids to school and take care of basic home needs. I'm even helping my husband.”


This happy couple reminds me of a simple truth: FARM STEW is good missionary work! This quote inspired FARM STEW's work:

When right methods of cultivation are adopted, there will be far less poverty than now exists. We intend to give the people practical lessons upon the improvement of the land, and thus induce them to cultivate their land, now lying idle. If we accomplish this, we shall have done good missionary work.—Ellen G. White, Letter 42, 1895

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Robert Lubega